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Mosquirix – Know all about world’s first Malaria vaccine

Recently, Mosquirix – the world’s first malaria vaccine was approved and recommended by the WHO on October 6.

This is the first vaccine ever made that can significantly fight malaria at a very severe level as well.

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This vaccine was first tested on young African children and the results were pretty impressive.

The vaccine acts against the deadly malaria parasite P. falciparum globally. Malaria is most prevalent in Africa.

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After it was tested on large scale, the vaccine could prevent approximately 4 out 10 cases of malaria in a 4 years’ time-period.

The world has never seen a vaccine to prevent Malaria. This disease dates back to 2700 BC which had contributed to the decline of the Roman Empire and the weakening of the local population during the colonisation of the Americas.

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There were massive losses for British forces during the Revolutionary War. Thousands of American soldiers died in the Indo-Pacific during World War II. The western countries had successfully terminated this disease by the 1950s and it was possible by reducing and controlling mosquito breeding areas.

But today, the countries can make people immune to this disease. It is the first-ever malaria vaccine that has completed all of its clinical trials and received a positive response from the EMA (European Medicines Agency).

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It is also the first to immunize children in 3 national ministries. More than 80,000 children in Malawi, Kenya and Ghana have been vaccinated as a part of the pilot programme.

According to WHO, the vaccine is used to prevent Malaria in children who live in regions where the malaria transmission level is high to moderate.

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The vaccine has to be inoculated in 4 doses in children.

Although the vaccine is strongly recommended by WHO, there is still a long way to go for its approval and reach the hospitals and pharmacies, said Dr Prakash Srinivasan who is an Assistant professor at John Hopkins School of Public Health and an expert on malaria vaccines.

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The recommendation of Mosquirix didn’t see the light of the world as the world is still fighting from a world-threatening disease ‘COVID 19’ and hundreds of vaccines made for the same.

This vaccine is a breakthrough to combat Malaria and the world hopes it is equally visible to the world in the near future as COVID 19 vaccines so that more and more countries can fight Malaria and protect them for this deadly disease as swift as they are combating COVID 19.

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